Scarface

After seeing all the wannabe gangsters on MTV Cribs point to their Scarface posters and/or DVD, I decided to finally watch the movie. Now halfway through and finally understand their fascination. Here is this guy Tony Montana a Cuban immigrant who comes from nothing, and makes a name for himself. However, considering that he made his fortune through the drug trade which comes with a great deal of violence, I find it difficult to root for Tony because you know the story won’t end well. But hey, it’s beautiful film making, so off I got to watch the last hour.

8 Comments
  1. I love Scarface. However everytime I see it, I have trouble sleeping because I think there are hundreds of pissed-off Columbians scaling the side of my house.
    Good movie, terribly violent.

  2. Dear Ursula,
    Just came to say sorry for being mean on the Invisible Stranger’s blog. I am thoroughly ashamed of myself.
    Yours sincerely,
    Phil from London

  3. i rented it last month for the same reason urs but i still didn’t watch it. i just don’t hava a real interest.

  4. I grew up watching the movie, I had memories of it before I even knew what it was. So I like it, it’s a good movie and I think it stands the test of being watched over and over again. Plus when you own it men get really really excited.

  5. If you like DePalma’s version, you really owe it to yourself to see the original movie starring Paul Muni.
    I think rappers like to associate themselves with the Depalma version due to a misplaced desire to appear as if they are overcoming obstacles to achieve their goals.
    Personally, there is a big difference betweeen someone who achieves his goals through education and some scrub who gets to the top because he sells drugs or gets a record deal (when it comes to rap music, the two are irreversibly entwined… think of producer suge knight, rapers EZ-E & Ice Cube).
    Most of these rappers pretend to be from “tha street” and wouldn’t know thuglife from an episode of The Real World. A case in point is the popularity of Tupac Shakur. Here is the ultimate form of marketing at work. He was raised upper-middle class, spent a great deal of time in the affluent neighborhoods of Santa Rosa and got his start rapping with The Digital Underground. He was a poser and died because of it.
    Very little rap artists bring anything to the medium. Few are original. Fewer still have any real talent. It is 90% marketing, 5% ability & 5% timing. Ten years from now, where do you think 50 Cent will be? Eminem? These guys are the Vanilla Ice of the new millenium.

  6. I only recently saw this for the first time myself. I thought it was basically “MacBeth” in many ways. I had always had this notion of it being mindless but it wasn’t. I do think it’s misinterpretted by the posers you mentioned though.

  7. E! You really shouldn’t talk about things you have no idea about. You said Tupac grew up in the in the upper-middle class, are you serious? The lived in Brooklyn as a child before moving to Baltimore because his mothers crack habit forced it. Childhood friend Jada Pinkett, Will Smith’s wife, said that when they were younger Pac was too embarassed to bring her over his house because he was so poor. He then had to moved to California with relatives because his mother couldnt afford him, in Cali his relatives couldn’t afford to house him so he squatted in houses with a group of friends, they later formed the rap group One Nation. At this time Pac had to sell drugs to survive, he was later introduced to Shock G of Digital Underground and then made a name for himself. So don’t you ever say pac was a poser. He lived everything he talked about.

  8. First I would like to say Forget all of you scarface is my hero and always will be so F@@@@ you.

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