Reserve Discrimination

Schools that reject applicants solely based on race have no place in our society. Furthermore, it doesn’t matter whether or not federal funds are involved. Reverse discrimination is reserve discrimination. As such, it will be interesting to see whether or not ruling below gets upheld.

Hawaiians-Only Policy at School Upheld
Mon Nov 17, 6:04 PM ET Add U.S. National – AP to My Yahoo!
By JAYMES SONG, Associated Press Writer
HONOLULU – A federal judge ruled Monday that the exclusive Kamehameha Schools may continue its Hawaiians-only admissions policy, rejecting a discrimination complaint from a student who said the policy violated his civil rights.
U.S. District Judge Alan Kay said the admissions policy passed muster because of the school’s unique historical circumstances. Since the private school receives no federal funding, it should not be held to the same scrutiny as public schools, Kay said.

3 Comments
  1. I know this is weird coming from a Black man, but I agree with the ruling. An organization that doesn’t have any reliance from the “group”, doesn’t have a mandate to accept members of the “group”.
    It cuts both ways too. The “group” has no mandate to accept member of the organization either. The education received at such an exclusionary school may lack value in the real world. In my opinion, I would view the lack of diversity as detrimental to the students. As an admissions counselor or HR rep, I might be reluctant to admit/hire a candidate with such a limited backgroud.

  2. I think that social organizations that cater to a specific section of the population based on race, religion, gender are fine. However, I draw the line with schools. Primarily because they play such a critical role in the development of a child. As such, I think schools at all levels should be integrated. Thinking that would make for a better society in the long run. There is much to be learnt about oneself and about others who are “different.” This is a multi-cultural society and we need to embrace and celebrate our differences. Unfortunately, many children are never exposed and so stereotypical views which may not be accurate get passed down from one generation to the next. Also, I am of the opinion that children who live in a cocoon and are never exposed to the harsh realities of life (i.e. like someone not liking you because of your race), have a difficult time functioning in society. Thus, these segregated schools are not doing the kids any favors in the long run. Besides, how can we truly realize the potential of integration if we head back to segregation?

  3. I was just surfing the internet, and I came across this article. I realize it’s dated, yet the ignorance reflected by yourself is only a glimpse into the increasing disregard for Hawaiian history and culture in the United States, and I couldn’t just let it get by without me saying anything. The problem with your post is, you probably have no idea what the mission of the school is or have any knowledge of Hawaiian history and the oppression by the United States and forceful, and, recognized, illegal annexation of the Hawaiian kingdom in nineteenth century. In response to the HR firm, someone who doesn’t do his research about his possible future employees and makes decisions based on an assumption would probably be better for the the applicant … who wants to work for lazy firm anyway? The “segregated” schools probably have more diversity in one student than a United Nations training facility. In Hawaiian we have a saying, Uhi mai ka lani po … “darkness from the sky spreads out.” Thanks for the reasuring post from those to lazy to make an attempt to understand another culture.

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