Tepper Isn’t Going Out

While trying to recompose myself during an extended lunch, I read: Tepper Isn’t Going Out by Calvin Trillin. And despite my foul mood, couldn’t help but chuckle. Story is about a guy in New York who finds legal spots to park and then sits in his car reading the paper despite the fact that he actually has a garage spot. This causes other motorists to get angry as he’s taking up a perfectly legal spot he doesn’t really need to use. Of course, there are others who don’t mind so much. I laughed while reading the story as a couple years ago; my best guy friend went out of town for about a long weekend and left me with his car. After driving home from the airport, I found this awesome spot right across from my building and I didn’t move the car until it was time to pick him up at the airport. However, during those few days when I had the car, I would often go and sit and within a matter of minutes, other motorist would come up and ask if I was going out. Every time I said no. I knew my behavior was strange and frustrating to others but I was trying to decide whether or not to really give up this really good stop. Nothing I could think of doing (not even shopping or a long drive in the country) could convince me to move the car. Why? Well if you know my neighborhood, you would also know that street parking is somewhat scarce. As such, most buildings in the neighborhood (like my own) that provides parking charge about $200 a month to park your car. It’s really tough finding a spot on the street. I’ve had quite a few friends circle around the neighborhood for an hour and still couldn’t find anything. Most often, they just leave without coming up. Heck, my best guy friend won’t come visit me for this reason (well that’s one of the excuses he gives me anyway). And if you do manage to find a spot, you better be good at parallel parking. I’m horrible at it. Just horrible!! So that’s why all that weekend, I kept saying, nope – not going out!

1 Comment
  1. When I got my car I was ecstatic. Then I realized what a pain parking was. More often than not, after driving home from work, I’d have to wait another 30 or so minutes just to get a parking space.
    If it was the weekend, that car did not move inch one!
    And, same as you experienced, many of my friends would not come over because of the parking situation. (or we have the same kind of friends who make the same excuses)
    I’ve realized now, (after two car accidents-neither my fault and a stolen vehicle), I just really don’t need a car in the city.

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