The Race Card

I need to stop watching media coverage of the after effects of hurricane Katrina. The images are upsetting enough but when I hear the comments from race politicians and assorted celebrities that the response was slow because the people affected are poor and black, I want to shout and scream.
While I realize I don’t have all the facts, I think it is safe to say that the American government at all levels was taken by surprise and unprepared for the level of devastation. The Secretary of Homeland Defense said as much in a press conference today.
As such, you can make the argument that enough funds were not given to adequately sure up the levees before hand as those who would be affected (mostly poor and black) didn’t have the lobbying power to get this done — but once hurricane Katrina passed through, I just don’t think that race was the ultimate factor in deciding how fast or at what level to respond.
So playing up the racial angle is not helping the immediate cause and it is a divisive tactic. That is not what is needed at this point. The people in New Orleans and all the other affected areas need Americans to be united in its resolve. Race baiting is not going to help that cause.

1 Comment
  1. Good for you for seeing through black “leaders” who would put politics and personal agendas above actually getting the victims the help they need. Black, white, whatever… we are ALL human beings, and I know the President firmly believes ALL life is precious and was as disgusted as the rest of us that the rescue efforts were as dismal as they were. I hope, as a white female, that the country’s black communities can one day be represented by black leaders who will put THEM first and start doing more for black communities than just trying to make them perpetual victims. Martin Luther King would be disgusted by Jesse Jackson…

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