Wedding Bells!

It’s good to meet your friend’s family, especially their parents. You get to learn so much more about your friend’s childhood by the stories their parents tell. Sometimes the stories are sad or even embarrassing, but for the most part, what gets shared are wonderful memories. Between the laughter, new stories emerge and most sentences start with: “remember when.” So it’s sort of sad that my friends will never meet my Mom. So much of my childhood is a distant memory to me that I’d love to hear her reminisce about what I was like back them. I suppose I could ask my father since he’s still alive, but he wouldn’t be able to tell me much as he wasn’t really in our lives. We did spend a few summers with him during our pre-teen years, but he often left us in the care of the hired help without a thought in the world about our welfare. Oh well! Maybe in another life. I bring all of this up as earlier tonight I met one of my friend’s Mom and her Aunt. They came in from Washington State & Colorado as my friend is getting married next June and they’re here to help with wedding preparations. So a bunch of us went over for a welcome barbeque. My friend landed a true gem for a future husband so I know they’ll make a wonderful couple. Hopefully one day I’ll get to rally my own troops (probably my sisters) to plan a wedding. Then again, maybe I’ll just run off to Hawaii and get married on the beach. Of course, when I (we) get back, we’d throw a party for family and friends. Weddings while a wonderful thing to share with family and friends have gotten way too expensive.

2 Comments
  1. There are more people than parents that remember your childhood…older sisters and aunts are plenty good at reminiscing, that you shouldn’t have to depend on dad for that.

  2. True, very true. My great Aunt Dorothy (Nenen) who was like a second mom is very good at that. But she lives very far from me so I don’t get to hear them much. Plus nothing can replace the look on a parent’s face as they retell a memorable story about your childhood. I suppose I’ve never really gotten over loosing my mom at 42. She was way too young.

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